Last edited by Mazutaur
Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

6 edition of Monuments to the Lost Cause found in the catalog.

Monuments to the Lost Cause

Women, Art, and the Landscapes of Southern Memory

  • 252 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by University of Tennessee Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Political activity,
  • United States - Civil War,
  • Influence,
  • History,
  • War memorials,
  • History - U.S.,
  • United States,
  • History: American,
  • Southern States,
  • Monuments,
  • American - General,
  • United States - State & Local - South,
  • Civil War, 1861-1865,
  • Women

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsCynthia Mills (Editor), Pamela H. Simpson (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages265
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8734740M
    ISBN 101572332727
    ISBN 109781572332720

    This is a list of Confederate monuments and memorials in the state of Georgia. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, there are at least public spaces with Confederate monuments in Georgia.. A law from the early twentieth century, last amended in , says that no publicly owned military monuments can be relocated, removed, concealed, obscured, or altered unless . The Lost Cause 1. The Lost Cause is the name commonly given to a literary and intellectual movement that sought to reconcile the traditional Southern white society to the defeat of the Confederate States of America in the Civil War. White Southerners sought consolation in attributing their loss to factors beyond their control and to betrayals of their heroes and cause.

    Yes, we lost a war, these statues say, but however futile our cause, as white people we are at least better than you. They were monuments to white supremacy then, and they are monuments to white supremacy now. That alone is sufficient reason to take them down. People in New Orleans were asking, Curtis writes, Where will this end?   Untangling the Lost Cause myth from the American story will be hard But that's the only way to topple Confederate statues without creating a slippery : William R. Black.

      Recent years have seen a resurgence of Lost Cause propaganda promoted by remnants of the UDC and SCV, as well as by openly white-supremacist and so-called "alt-right" groups, often in connection with fights over Confederate monuments. Elements of the Lost Cause narrative have also been incorporated into mainstream conservative political.   Black Confederates: exploding America's most persistent myth Under Trump, old fractures – and falsehoods – are closer to the surface than ever. A .


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Monuments to the Lost Cause Download PDF EPUB FB2

"The Lost Cause" of the Confederacy and the effort to revitalize the Confederate historical memory by imposing monuments in cities and towns throughout the US was much more aggressive and connected to related issues of segregation, the KKK and other racist causes/5(2).

out of 5 stars Somethings Lost from the "Monuments To The Lost Cause" Reviewed in the United States on January 5, "The Lost Cause" of the Confederacy and the effort to revitalize the Confederate historical memory by imposing monuments in cities and towns throughout the US was much more aggressive and connected to related issues of Cited by: Monuments To The Lost Cause book.

Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. This richly illustrated collection of fourteen essays examines /5. To the Lost Cause, rewriting the narrative of the war was as important as erecting monuments, and it largely worked. Still to this day, many I know in. This richly illustrated collection of fourteen essays examines the ways in which Confederate memorials - from Monument Avenue to Stone Mountain - and the public rituals surrounding them testify to the tenets of the Lost Cause, a romanticized narrative of the war.

Several essays highlight the creative leading role played by women's groups in memorialization, while others. Politicians, pundits, historians, and concerned citizens today have declared Confederate monuments to be symbols of white supremacy and memorials to the Lost Cause and Jim Crow.

Those voices have become ever louder in reaction to the events in Charlottesville on August The words on the statues and those of the speakers at their dedications declare a. Robert M. Edsel, founder and chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation, said the cause was complications of the coronavirus.

She died in a rehabilitation center. Huthwaite was the last of the. The values these monuments stood for, he says, included a “glorification of the cause of the Civil War.” White women were instrumental in raising funds to build these Confederate monuments. Along with other Confederate memorials on Monument Avenue, it reflected the Lost Cause rewriting of the South’s past.

In this false version of history, slavery was a benign institution, the Civil War was fought over states’ rights, the North won because it had more men and more money but the South was morally superior. More than 90 percent of Confederate monuments were erected afterand much of this effort took place during the first two decades of the 20 th century.

By then, the “Lost Cause” myth, which described the Confederate cause in a positive and heroic light, had been firmly established in the national consciousness.

Page - That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military.

The introduction, written by Mills, succinctly provides an overview of the contents. Although diverse topics are investigated, the book’s title indicates that a major theme is the role of women in the realization of monuments for the “Lost Cause.” Five essays, distributed through the book’s four sections, emphasize these roles.

Planning a temple to the lost cause: the Confederate "battle abbey" / William M.S. Rasmussen Gratitude and gender wars: monuments to the women of the sixties / Cynthia Mills Commemorating the color line: the national mammy monument.

Most monuments built in Florida honor the Confederacy, praising the valor of Southern soldiers and often extolling the righteousness of their “Lost Cause.” At the same time, a fascinating minority of Union monuments also exists in.

Lost Cause The term "Lost Cause" emerged at the end of the Civil War when Edward Pollard, editor of the Richmond Examiner, popularized it with his book The Lost Cause, which chronicled the Confederacy's term swiftly came into common use as a reference not only to military defeat, but defeat of the "southern way of life"—a phrase that generally referred to the.

The Hallmark Of The Lost Cause Words | 6 Pages. easily accessible public information only a “Google” search away that there would be an outcry to have all memorials and monuments glorifying the Confederacy removed immediately, unfortunately that’s not the case.

Search Tips. Phrase Searching You can use double quotes to search for a series of words in a particular order. For example, "World war II" (with quotes) will give more precise results than World war II (without quotes). Wildcard Searching If you want to search for multiple variations of a word, you can substitute a special symbol (called a "wildcard") for one or more letters.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: XXX, Seiten: Contents: "A strong force of ladies": women, politics, and Confederate memorial associations in nineteenthcentury Raleigh / Catherine W. Bishir --Marking Union victory in the South: the construction of the National Cemetery system / Catherine W.

Zipf --Making history: African. 5. The “Lost Cause mystique” is not an easy concept to quantify (maybe it’s one of those things people feel they know when they see it). Logically it would seem you would have to separate where monuments and commemorations, which were numerous after the war in the north and south, began to diverge regionally to create a narrative.

In this presentation, Museum Historian John Coski demonstrates how Virginia's Confederate monuments reveal the choices made by memorialists as they decided how and what to remember about the Civil.

"Monuments to the Lost Cause: Women, Art, and the Landscapes of Southern Memory is an illustrated collection of fourteen essays examining the ways in which these memorials - from Monument Avenue to Stone Mountain - and the public rituals surrounding them testify to the tenets of the Lost Cause, a romanticized narrative of the war.

The missing statues that expose the truth about Confederate monuments He's currently writing a book on slavery and the Civil War in the American West. master propagandist of the Lost Cause. Students of the UDC have noted that in the past, the organization was a prime exponent of the so-called "Lost Cause" narrative.

One tenet of the "Lost Cause" is that slavery was a benign institution, and that slaves were loyal and faithful to their benevolent masters. The proposed monument fit right in with that worldview.